Tokyogasgroup csr report

Management Commitment

The Tokyo Gas Group actively supports diversity to promote the advancement of people with various talents as essential for our future growth and development.
 

As competition between energy companies continues to intensify, the Tokyo Gas Group strives to maintain its position as the customer's choice and to achieve sustainable growth and development far into the future.
One key priority for the Group as a whole is to promote diversity. For us to continue to meet diversifying customer needs, every Group employee must have the chance to excel and fully apply their knowledge, ability and experience and to work effectively in teams.
We are committed as a corporate group to developing and expanding systems to achieve this goal and foster employee awareness while continuing to proactively create an organizational culture in which all excel, regardless of gender, age, disability, nationality or sexual orientation, and whether they were hired straight out of university or mid-career. 


April 2018
Takashi Uchida
Representative Director, President and CEO
Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Basic Policy

The Tokyo Gas Group promotes workplace diversity as a corporate enterprise that offers every employee the opportunity to excel by applying their full knowledge, abilities, and experience.

(1) We structure our corporate organization to encourage mutual respect for diverse work styles while enhancing productivity.

(2) We proactively support the success of women as the foundation for promoting diversity across the organization.

(3) We deeply integrate the promotion of diversity into all our business operations through our Group Diversity Promotion Team.

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Framework for Promoting Diversity

The Tokyo Gas Group has set up a Group Diversity Promotion Team in the Personnel Department to work closely with management in effectively implementing a variety of initiatives and meeting the objectives of promoting women’s careers, increasing employment of persons with disabilities, and Grand Career Support*.
*Development of career opportunities for employees in their 50s or older.
 
Tokyo Gas Group Diversity Promotion Program
Tokyo Gas Group Diversity Promotion Program

Overview of the Tokyo Gas Group Diversity Promotion Activities

Overview of the Tokyo Gas Group Diversity Promotion Activities
DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Active Training and Elevation of Women

Tokyo Gas has been actively promoting the career development of women. In addition to enriching our programs to support a balance between childcare and work, we are strengthening employee awareness and evolving our corporate culture by hosting seminars on women’s career development. The ratio of women in management positions has increased by 3.5% in 9 years, from 4.1% in 2009 to 7.6% in 2018. Appointments to the general manager and manager level in particular have dramatically increased from 4 to 19, while the first women was promoted to managing executive officer in April 2018. Our goal is to raise our female management ratio to 10.0% by 2020.

Action Plan for Promoting Women’s Careers (Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.)Action Plan for Promoting Women’s Careers (Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.)

Ratio of Women in Management*1, 2
Third-party Assured
The ratio of female management is steadily rising as a result of strategic measures.
Ratio of Women in Management
*1 Number of Tokyo Gas employees (registered personnel) are as of April 1 of each fiscal year.
*2 Employees in supervisory positions, or employees of equivalent status.
Average Age by Gender*3
Third-party Assured
No significant difference in average age between male and female employees.
Average Age by Gender
*3 Tokyo Gas employees, as of end of March of each fiscal year.
Average Length of Employment by Gender*4
Third-party Assured
No significant difference in length of employment between male and female employees.
Average Length of Employment by Gender
*4 Tokyo Gas employees (registered personnel) as of end of March of each fiscal year.
Percentage Returning to Work from Parental Leave*5, 6
Third-party Assured
Most of our employees return to work after taking a maternity leave. 
Percentage Returning to Work from Parental Leave
*5 Tokyo Gas employees (registered personnel) as of end of March of each fiscal year.  
*6 Percentage of those returning to work after maternity leave in each fiscal year.
Hiring by Gender*7 
Third-party Assured

Number of women hired is increasing each year.

Hiring by Gender
*7 New graduates (graduates, undergraduates, technical college graduates) among Tokyo Gas employees as of April 1 of each fiscal year.  

Efforts for Promoting Female Advancement (Based on The Act of Women’s Participation and Advancement in the Workplace)

As part of our active efforts to recruit and retain female employees, we are building employee awareness and evolving our corporate culture through seminars we host for both female employees and their managers. 

 

 Seminars and Lectures in FY2017*8

Date Theme Number of attendees
May 2017 Seminar for managers with subordinates who have small children 38
November 2017 Lecture on promoting the active participation of diverse human resources 350
January 2018 Seminar on women’s career development 34
March 2018 Seminar for employees returning to work after childcare leave 27

*8 Data represents the Tokyo Gas Group employees.

Training for Female Employees

 
Women’s Career Development Seminar 
Focused on early career development, we provide female employees in their 20s with opportunities to proactively develop their careers. 
Enthusiastic female employees attending a seminarEnthusiastic female employees attending a seminar

 

 

Women’s Seminar for Returning to Work after Childcare Leave
Prior to returning from childcare leave, female employees are offered opportunities to easily transition back to work and balance work and childcare by envisioning how they can practically manage their working style and work in cooperation and collaboration with their managers and peers. 
Seminar on returning to work after maternity leaveSeminar on returning to work after maternity leave

 

 

Seminar on Career Development for Parents of Small Children
We provide opportunities for considering long-term career development to those who have spent a given period of time balancing work and childcare. 
Male employees also attend the seminar for managing their careers while raising children.Male employees also attend the seminar for managing their careers while raising children.
 

Awareness-Building and Corporate Culture Development for Managers 

 
Seminars for Supervisors with Subordinates Who Are Raising Children
For supervisors who have subordinates that are raising children, we offer seminars on management methods to help them understand and encourage support for balancing work and childcare.
Seminar for supervisorsSeminar for supervisors

 

Manager Training
New supervisors learn about performance evaluation, staff development skills, and diversity management. Diversity management includes practical training on the needs for promoting the advancement of diverse talent including women, understanding childcare and nursing care programs, how to communicate with diverse staff through case studies and role playing. 
Practical management trainingPractical management training
 

 

Lecture on Promoting the Advancement of Diverse Talent
General managers and managers learn from external lecturers how to create a workplace in which every individual can perform at their highest level. In 2017, we invited Yoshie Komuro, CEO of Work and Life Balance Inc.  
Seminar on work-life balanceSeminar on work-life balance

 

 

Panel Discussion on Promoting Women’s Careers
In October 2016, our managers held a panel discussion on expanding the range of occupations for women and raising management awareness on the topic of “Further advancing the careers of female employees.” About 300 people attended, and the female employees showed a particularly strong interest.
Panel discussionPanel discussion

 

Topic
Female Advancement in the Pipeline Department

Since fiscal 2010, we have regularly appointed female employees to positions historically assigned to males, such as field work. As the career scope of our female employees expands, their work styles will diversify. Since fiscal 2015, we have held gatherings for female employees in the field works department so they can exchange ideas and concerns on career development involving times of maternity and raising children. From these gatherings we incorporated their opinions into changes such as creating a uniform for female staff and lighter tools and expanding female locker rooms, and generally worked to reinforce a female employee-friendly environment. 

External Evaluation

We are being recognized through Kurumin certification by the Minister of Health, Labor and Welfare as a company that actively supports childcare based on the Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising Next-Generation Children. We were also designated as a Nadeshiko Brand in fiscal 2017 for the second consecutive year by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and the Tokyo Stock Exchange. 
 

kurumin mark  NADESHIKO BRAND 2018

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Ongoing Career Development Support

In April 2016, we established a Grand Career Support Program, replacing our previous programs, which had primarily focused on enriching the life of employees in retirement. The new program provides comprehensive support for employee career development assuming that they will work until age 65. Also, it is intended to improve the motivation and performance of our employees over 50 years old by clarifying the work they can contribute through interviews with training and career consultants in the Personnel Department.

State of Reemployment after Mandatory Retirement
  Unit 2015 2016 2017
Total number of retired employees *1   Person 319 348 273
Number of reemployed employees *2 Tokyo Gas *3 Person 
(%)
241 
(75.5)
251
(72.1)
203
(74.4)
Subsidiaries, etc. 26 
(8.2)
42
(12.1)
46
(16.8)
*1 Number of employees of mandatory retirement at age 60
*2 Number of rehired employees after mandatory retirement
*3 Data for Tokyo Gas, Co., Ltd.
DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Employment of Persons with Disabilities

Third-party Assured
At Tokyo Gas, persons with disabilities perform all kinds of work alongside other employees. The ratio of employed persons with disabilities as of June 2018 was 2.35%, well above the statutory rate.* The Liaison Committee to Promote Employment of Disabled People was launched in April 2016 to foster understanding, further expand employment and create more opportunities for persons with disabilities to succeed professionally at Tokyo Gas. It also strives to develop safer, more accessible working conditions.

*The statutory employment rate is determined by the Employment Rate System for Persons with Disabilities and is the percentage of regular workers who are required to be employees with disabilities.

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Prohibiting LGBT Discrimination

Our Code of Conduct, which defines the required values and standards of behavior for everyone at the Tokyo Gas Group, explicitly prohibits discrimination and harassment on the grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity. In the Management Commitment, It is clearly stated that in order to be a corporate group, we must proactively create an organizational culture for everyone and excel, regardless of sexual orientation. In addition, our consultation desks satisfy the adoption of “employment management measures concerning problems caused by sexual harassment in the workplace” specified in Article 11 of the Act on Securing, etc. of Equal Opportunity and Treatment between Men and Women in Employment. We provide training in LGBT issues, which is incorporated, for example, training for human rights promotion leaders. Additionally, we organize related talks by outside speakers for middle-level managers and human resource managers.

Training for human rights promotion leaders
Training for human rights promotion leaders

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Accessible Bathrooms

Multipurpose, accessible bathrooms are available and equipped to accommodate people using wheelchairs as well as ostomates* in addition to fitting boards for changing clothes at three locations in the Tokyo Gas head office building. Groupwide, nine accessible bathrooms are provided in seven buildings.

*An ostomate is a person who has undergone surgery to create an artificial opening in the body (a “stoma”) to discharge waste due to damage to the digestive tract or urinary tract caused by illness or accident.


Multipurpose, accessible bathroom Multipurpose, accessible bathroom
Multipurpose, accessible bathroom
DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Supportive Environment for Balancing Work and Childcare or Nursing Care

As a major pillars of our personnel policy, we are strengthening our organization by drawing out the skills of every employee so they can achieve their full potential. We practice a style of management that cultivates and maximizes the diverse characteristics and abilities of employees and creates a workplace environment that is comfortable at different life stages, so that everyone can meet the expectations for their respective roles and make the most of their abilities.
In April 2014, we extended the period of eligibility to work shorter hours to care for small children from the end of third grade to the end of sixth grade. Provision was further enhanced in April 2017 employees were permitted to flexibly change the date on which they intended to return to work from parental leave if they were unable to obtain a nursery place for their child. As for nursing care, a three-year period for a leave or for nursing care work has become available to all employees. The parental leave, nursing care leave, and shortened working hour schemes are longer than those required by law. We also offer systems that allow employees to take leaves of absence for fertility treatment, to attend events at their children's and grandchildren's schools, and to provide nursing care for family members, and these systems are widely used by employees.
We have introduced other arrangements to further increase the options for employee work styles, including leaves to allow employees to accompany spouses working overseas.
 

Major Programs and Usage *1
Program Content Item 2015 2016 2017
Male Female Male Female Male Female
Parental leave Until the end of April immediately following the child’s 3rd birthday Number of users 2 83 2 65 5 45
Rate of return to work (%)
*2
100 100 100 100 100 92
Shorter hours for parents of small children Flex-time system is available during pregnancy and until child completes 6th grade Number of users 213 227 3 214
Nursing care leave Up to 3 years for one relative within the second degree of kinship requiring nursing care. Number of users 3 4 0 1
Nursing care work Flex-time system is available for up to 3 years for one relative within the second degree of kinship requiring nursing care. Number of users 0 3 0 2
Leave to accompany partner For employees accompanying a spouse posted overseas Number of users 4 4 3
Community service leave Special leave (paid) for up to 5 days within 1 year Total (including repeat users) 88 48 58
Sabbatical system For employees who reach the age of 30, 35, 40 and 50
Provided with commemorative gifts and special leave (paid)
Number of users 594 514 673

*1 Data for Tokyo Gas, Co., Ltd.
*2 Percentage of employees taking parental leave each fiscal year who returned to work at the company.


Support for Work-Parenting Balance
Support for Work-Parenting Balance

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Work Style Reform

Management tenaciously focuses on the value of “time” long working hours the value of “time” to rectify and reduce long working hours so that every employee can work with enthusiasm while maximizing their potential.
In addition to establishing diverse working styles, we review work processes and methods while also taking action to boost organizational productivity.

Work Style Reform Action Plan

In fiscal 2018, we established and started implementing our “Work Style Reform Action Plan,” as required by Keidanren for member companies.
The plan defines goals for three focus areas: rectifying long working hours, encouraging employees to take annual leave, and promoting flexible work styles. We also set numerical targets to ensure successful implementation.

Work Style Action Plan
  KPIs (Numerical Targets)
Theme 1:
Rectifying long working hours
By fiscal 2020, reduce cases of over 80 hours of extra non-legal working hours per month to zero (0), and in fiscal 2017 cut cases of 60–80 hours/month by half
Theme 2:
Encouraging employees to take annual leave
Reduce the number of employees who have taken fewer than 5 annual paid vacations during fiscal 2018 to zero (0)
Theme 3:
Promoting flexible work styles
Create an environment that allows for teleworking for all employees by 2020
 
Generally Prohibiting Overtime Work after 20:00
In principle, we prohibit overtime work after 20:00 so as to help our employees maintain their health, promote diversity in our human resources, and secure the work-life balance.
 
Work-at-home Program
The work-at-home program was tested in fiscal 2016 and fully introduced in some workplaces in fiscal 2017. Digitizing documents and the use of information and mobile devices to boost productivity have made it possible for employees to work from home. Over 350 employees have already applied for these arrangements, and we expect the number to rise as we increase the applicable workplaces and further update the ICT environment.
 
Mobile Working
Arrangements have been made to allow employees to work away from the office using mobile devices to more effectively use time spent commuting or in transit for greater efficiency.
 
Flex-time System
Employees can flexibly alter their reporting and leaving time between 7:00 and 22:00 through consultation with their superiors as long as they include the required core time (mandatory working hours) of 10:00 to 15:00. This system applies to about 90% of our employees, excluding shift workers.
 
Leave-on-Time Day
We designate a monthly “Leave-on-Time Day” as an opportunity to reflect on working productively by maximizing results within a given period.
 
Premium Friday
In an effort to review work processes and methods while also boosting productivity, employees have been encouraged since February 2017 to take a half day off or use flex-time to finish work early on the last Friday of each month as long as this does not disrupt work.
 
Morning-oriented Work to Make Use of Summer Evenings
In July and August only, employees are encouraged to start and finish work around 30–60 minutes earlier than usual by utilizing the flex-time program, as long as this does not disrupt work, so they can enjoy their personal lives during a longer evening.
 
Encouraging Employees to Take Leaves in the Summer
The period from July to September has been designated the “period for summer leaves” with the goal of encouraging all employees to take at least seven days of paid leave during this time.
 
Declaration of Time to Leave Office
To promote a work style that focuses on the value of time, we ask employees to decide and declare the time they plan to leave the office each day. A motivational poster is displayed at each workplace to establish a working environment that makes it easier to leave the office.
Reminders on the importance of targeting time to leave work
Reminders on the importance of
targeting time to leave work
   
Robotic Process Automation (RPA)
The RPA Office promotes operational optimization by actively utilizing RPA, which automates business operations through software. As of April 2018, eight departments have adopted the program, and others plan to do so as well.
 
“Waku Waku Work” Work Style Innovation
We have defined positive, exciting styles of work that generate value and raise productivity as Waku Waku Work, which is work that is value creating, varied and fun. Using ICT and other resources, we have been working on the following three forms of Waku Waku Work categorized according to objective. Under the leadership of promotion managers at each department and headquarters, each workplace has been exploring and implementing exciting work styles.

Challenges to Overcome toward Achieving Goals

Challenges to Overcome toward Achieving Goals

*Working hours = hours invested + hours expended

Hours invested: time used to generate value (thinking, communicating, etc.)

Hours expended: time consumed without generating value (administrative tasks, searches, transit time, etc.)


“Three Works” as Measures for Work Innovation

 

“Three Works” as Measures for Work Innovation

DFF Inc., Corporate Social Responsibility Sect, General Administration Dept., Corporate Planning Dept., Resources & Global Business Division, Energy Solution Div, Power Buisiness Dept., Pipeline Network Division, IT Division, Residential Sales Div., Fundamental Technology Dept., Energy Solution Div, Environmental Affairs Dept., Purchasing Dept. , Health Insurance & Employees' Welfare Sect., Personnel Dept., Internal Audit Dept., Audit & Supervisory Board Member's Office, Compliance Dept., Regional Development Div., Finance Dept, TGES, TOKYO GAS COMMUNICATIONS, INC.